People

 

DogFACS

Dr. Bridget Waller

Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology, University of Portsmouth

 

The overarching focus of my research is the evolution of social communication. I am particularly interested in human and non-human animal facial expression and emotion, and how these signals contribute to sociality and social bonding. I have been part of the development team for various FACS systems, including ChimpFACS, MaqFACS and OrangFACS.

 

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Dr. Juliane Kaminski

Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology, University of Portsmouth

 

My main research interest is the evolution of human sociality with a particular focus on social cognition. Here I am especially interested in the individual’s understanding of others’ perception, knowledge, intentions, desires and beliefs. In my research I follow a comparative approach, and one comparison is that of humans with their closest living relatives, the great apes. Another comparison is that of humans with one of their closest living domesticated species, the domestic dog.

 

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Dr. Anne Burrows

Duquesne University and University of Pittsburgh

 

I am a biological anthropologist and my main interests are the evolutionary morphology of primate facial expression and primate feeding mechanisms. I have also worked on the functional and evolutionary morphology of primate sensory ecology.

 

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Cátia Caeiro

Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology, University of Portsmouth

 

I am an Environmental Biologist with a MSc degree, in which I studied the social behaviour of gorillas. My research interests are in the broad area of animal behaviour, from an ecological and evolutionary point of view. I worked on the DogFACS project as a research assistant.

 

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Kate Peirce

Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology, University of Portsmouth

 

I am a research assistant on the project and I am interested in the evolution of human-animal interaction and the effect of domestication on social cognition.

 

 

www.dogfacs.com

 

Department of Psychology

University of Portsmouth

UK

 

Last update: 08.08.2015